understanding the partylist system, part 1

The Partylist System was established in 1995 in an attempt to give marginalized sectors more representation in our legislative system. As of present, out of the 250+ seats in the House of Representatives, 55 are allocated for groups that represent such sectors, also known as “partylists”. Unfortunately, a recent survey reveals that 70% of Filipinos are not even aware of the partylist system. I encourage everyone to read up about the partylist system and inform everyone you know about the said system. In the present social system, the poor have virtually no say in how the Government runs and operates.
Here are a few examples of “marginalized sectors” and the partylists that represent them.
PAGCOR chairman Ephraim Genuino is a marginalized sector. He will be represented by BIDA (Batang Iwas Droga) Partylist
The Ampatuan clan is a marginalized sector. They will be represented by the ADAM (Adhikain ng mga Dakilang Anak ng Maharlika) Partylist.
Presidential son Mikey Arroyo is a marginalized sector. He will be represented by Ang Galing Pinoy Partylist
Mikey caught boozing-up at the height of typhoon Ondoy
Dept. of Energy secretary Angelo Reyes and the oil cartel compose a marginalized sector. They will be represented by 1-UTAK Partylist
we take offense at the picture: he has one long-lasting legacy. the oil price hikes.
Quezon City politician Bernadette Herrera is a marginalized sector. She will be represented by the BH (Bagong Henerasyon) Partylist.
Presidential in-law Ma. Lourdes Arroyo is a marginalized sector. She will be represented by Ang Kasangga Partylist.
Dept. of Education secretary Jesli Lapus and private school owners compose a marginalized sector. They will be represented by A-Teacher Partylist.

Military men who violate human rights compose a marginalized sector. They will be represented by ANAD and Bantay Partylists.
Government projects compose a marginalized sector. It will be represented by Agbiag Timpuyog Ilocano (AGBIAG), Babae para sa Kaunalara (BABAE KA), League of Youth for Peace and Development (LYPAD), and Kalahi Advocates for Overseas Filipinos (KALAHI) Partylists.
Source: Commission on Elections, 2010
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